wm memory training and developing categorical perception

Talk about what you've discovered by using ETC-- and post your high ranks!
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mochi
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Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2011 11:46 am

wm memory training and developing categorical perception

Post by mochi » Mon Jun 10, 2019 1:35 pm

Chris- Are you familiar with Christine Jaegi's research on the N-back task- and working memory?

There is a version of the dual n-back task called Brain Workshop. It allows you to use piano tones in the audio channel (instead of letters)


Take a 4-back task for example. Say you have a sequence C A C B. The goal is then to identify if the next four tones are the same or different from the tone 4 notes earlier in the sequence.

The strategy I use is to try to hold the four tones in the sequence in memory, and track what position i am in the sequence as the next sequence comes up, and compare note for note. And each time, if the new note is different from the one at the same position previous in the sequence, then i will remember the new note at that position


So if you have a beginning sequence: C A C B, the next sequence might come up:
D A E C

So at position one I hear (mentally)

C A C B

At 2 i will be hearing

D A C B

at 3

D A E B

and at 4

D A E C

So each time, I am altering the "tone word" by one "phoneme" at a time.

I thought of this because I was remembering some of what you had written about learning language, and how the child has to learn which combinations of phonemes make valid words in order to learn the rules of a given language.

I was wondering if a game which forced the player to have to mentally combine individual tones into tone words, and then perform mental transformations on those "words" to produce new ones, could potentially help an adult learn perfect pitch, or at least, aid the development of a musically useful relative pitch.

Any thoughts?

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