Why only 7 colors and not 12?

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petew83
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Why only 7 colors and not 12?

Post by petew83 » Sat Jun 18, 2005 3:40 pm

Why only 7 colors and not 12?

aruffo
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tonal scales

Post by aruffo » Sun Jun 19, 2005 12:55 pm

In addition to teaching absolute pitch, We Hear and Play is a method for learning piano and musical expression. In Western music especially, tonality and harmony (being "in key") is a critical component.

Therefore, We Hear and Play uses seven colors to represent the tones of the C-major scale, and the C-major scale is the major focus of elementary training.

The accidentals are represented as bi-colored dots; this actively demonstrates their relationship to the adjacent tones (a green/yellow dot is thus visibly an Eb/D#) and also encourages a child to recognize that the accidentals share certain chromatic qualities with those adjacent tones.

K. Miyazaki, in Japan, has done numerous studies on how musicians with absolute pitch often think of C as a "fixed do" and find it difficult to transpose or think in other tonalities. We Hear and Play avoids this by introducing a child to additional keys (G-major and F-major) in its later books while maintaining a firm grounding in C-major. C-major is a necessary "home key", but it is not allowed to be the only key!

aruffo
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Post by aruffo » Thu Jun 23, 2005 1:44 am

I double-checked my answer with Mrs. Taneda. She agreed, and added:

We don't use 12 colors because the flat and sharp notes are in relation to the origin note. The note is on the same line, although you use a sharp or flat. If we used three different colors for d, d flat and d sharp this would cause a great bewilderment.

In our method the do (red) is always fixed. Without fixed-do you will not be able to educate absolute pitch, but we also teach transposition starting in Volume 3-- and later a child can try by themselves to transpose little pieces. So transposition will become easy for them.

cjhealey
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Post by cjhealey » Mon Mar 19, 2007 10:00 pm

The seven note idea is interesting and i actually read something about a person with perfect pitch who said the same thing:

http://wtceo.org/wtcenvironmentalorgani ... langer.htm

I'm pursuming that is a real account and not just a story...

also, the last segment of that page there is part of the story which indicates perfect pitch can definatley be lost...

Chris :-)

Sleeper
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Post by Sleeper » Fri Apr 24, 2009 7:18 am

That story wasn't exactly flattering. Saying there are 12, or 88, or infinite (probably the real most correct answer), or 7 notes are all equally reasonable. I hated it when teachers (in any subject) have some specific answer they have in their heads, and ask an incredibly vague question to get the answer. Then they say answers that do fit the question (but not what they have in their heads) are "wrong".



As for her losing perfect pitch, it probably was just the aging related perfect pitch shift. If she and the people she knew were ignorant of that phenomenon, it could seem like misnaming notes meant the ability was completely faulty, rather than merely off by a bit.

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