help anyone?

Thoughts and responses regarding the research at acousticlearning.com.
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samleak
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Joined: Sun Feb 28, 2010 2:17 pm
Location: UK

help anyone?

Post by samleak » Mon Nov 08, 2010 7:15 pm

I'm looking for a programme that will play any selection of notes I ask it too at me randomly - for example if I want it to play just C E and Ab at me in a random order it will be able to - or perhaps all of the white notes randomly etc etc

Does anyone know of such a programme?

Incidentally - I want to play this against either home made MIDI files of common progressions in regularly shifting tonalities - or snippets from spotify radio for a set of music I've never heard before and thus will not already know the keys of.

I want to see if putting myself in a situation where I can hear the notes numerically (tonality based relative pitch) but cannot name them will force me into a position where I need to pick up on some other characteristic to name them. I've been thinking about beginning with C E and Ab, then filling in the whole tone scale later ( C D E Gb Ab Bb) - and then finally adding all notes of the chromatic scale.

It might not work but it's an idea..... 'The Sam Leak Method' ;) haha


so - does anyone know of a programme that would do this for me?

aruffo
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Post by aruffo » Mon Nov 08, 2010 10:53 pm


Sleeper
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Post by Sleeper » Tue Nov 09, 2010 5:38 pm

Probably Tone Quiz.

I think the freeware version is no longer available, but you might be able to find it with some googling and through archive.org.

samleak
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Joined: Sun Feb 28, 2010 2:17 pm
Location: UK

Post by samleak » Thu Nov 11, 2010 11:50 am

thanks guys!

koenig
Posts: 51
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 3:21 am

Post by koenig » Sun Nov 21, 2010 11:10 am

There's a portable device that does that exact thing... in addition to all other manners of relative pitch training. http://www.perfectone.biz/

But, it would be much cheaper to just get one of those free programs.

Nikolaus
Posts: 52
Joined: Mon Nov 10, 2008 4:39 pm
Location: Dallas

Post by Nikolaus » Mon Nov 22, 2010 8:46 am

The pseudo-relative pitch drills found in "Perfectone" won't teach you relative pitch, and the perfect pitch drill won't teach you perfect pitch -- I think they're catering to the crowd that wants to pass some worthless ear training exam. As for the few exercises on that thing that might actually be useful, they're easily replaced by some application that does them better anyway. Just like the people who did EarMaster, Auralia, and MacGamut, these guys don't know how to teach. Damn them all. The wheel they reinvented isn't even round. Nice job guys.

koenig
Posts: 51
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 3:21 am

Post by koenig » Mon Nov 22, 2010 9:27 am

Do you have one? I think the possibilities on this thing are actually pretty extensive. If I am wrong though I'd like to hear what you believe to be good relative pitch training because I'd definitely like to try it.
Nikolaus wrote:The pseudo-relative pitch drills found in "Perfectone" won't teach you relative pitch, and the perfect pitch drill won't teach you perfect pitch -- I think they're catering to the crowd that wants to pass some worthless ear training exam. As for the few exercises on that thing that might actually be useful, they're easily replaced by some application that does them better anyway. Just like the people who did EarMaster, Auralia, and MacGamut, these guys don't know how to teach. Damn them all. The wheel they reinvented isn't even round. Nice job guys.

Nikolaus
Posts: 52
Joined: Mon Nov 10, 2008 4:39 pm
Location: Dallas

Post by Nikolaus » Mon Nov 29, 2010 9:11 am

nothing I'm sure you haven't already heard of, except that you have yet to tie all that knowledge into a truly coherent and effective system. Or maybe you already have (I don't know). All the relative pitch you do should center around scale-degree recognition. As for interval and chord quality drills, they're not gonna do ya much good in a musical setting. However, if you know the exact scale-degrees that comprise a particular chord, then not only do you immediately know its exact harmonic function (such as tonic or dominant), but also its exact voicing. ... like you'll hear FGBD in C as scale-degrees 4572 (like what ya did in Aruffo's frog game -- remember?). except that Aruffo's frog game (what's it called?) never taught the precision that scale-degree recognition allows for. if you can do this, then hearing chord quality (inversion etc.) is simply a given -- it 'll be built right into your perception! so then, what should ya do? i'll give ya a list of some great resources -- make of it what you will!

the famous Charlie Banacos exercise:
http://www.miles.be/index.php/articles/ ... s-exercise

Functional Ear Trainer will take care of the one note

join the yahoo group called developing_AP
click on the "files" section
download Pitch Player
that 'll take care of anything beyond the one note scale-degree exercise. do or don't sound a cadence -- your choice.

also sing chords from the bottom up as follows:

for instance,
in Cmaj
EF#GB (scale-degrees 3 #4 5 7)
play E
sing E (will be heard as 3)
play the chord EF#GB again
play F#
sing F#
listen for F# (as #4) in EF#GB
and so on and so forth
so in Amaj,
Amaj cadence
F#CDA (6 #2 4 1)
F# (be sure to sing)
F#CDA
C
F#CDA
D
F#CDA
A
F#CDA

do this in all keys beginning with two note
then do three and four in conjunction with recognition drills
this 'll speed up your progress a good amount.
each example should take a good thirty seconds.

download Novus Vetus:

http://fughetta-library.blogspot.com/se ... r-training

it's at the bottom.

Now, don't sing at first sight each of these melodies and then just move on, but memorize each of them in a number of keys using both types of solfege. Great stuff, I tell you. Carefully digest the entire book (... mmmmm delicious, I know).

remember, sight-singing is a natural product of literacy.

also, there's a book on amazon called Music for Sight Singing. It's kinda pricey, but I would pay a thousand dollars for it.

also another great resource:

http://www.lightandmatter.com/sight/sight.html

oh yeah, and there's melodia. but do the other ones first and then just skip to the end of melodia. (because it's dry.)

http://www.archive.org/details/melodiac ... 00coleuoft

PDF download on the right.

you can also get audiation assistant (demo available)

Art Levine interview (amazing interview on solfege):

http://artlevine.com/solfa.asp

As for melodic dictation, Melodic ID rocks. very practical (most, actually):

http://www.musicstudy.com/


also Chord ID is great for training yourself to hear chord function without focusing too much on scale-degrees or exact voicings -- a must have!

okay, okay. I've said enough. once you get the ball rolling with this, you'll realize why most ear training methods could be much better.

koenig
Posts: 51
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 3:21 am

Post by koenig » Mon Nov 29, 2010 9:35 am

Thanks very much for that, that should keep me busy for the next few years

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