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Comments and questions about Absolute Pitch Painter
zacxpacx
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Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2012 3:51 pm
Location: United States

Homepage Updates

Postby zacxpacx » Tue Nov 04, 2014 2:59 am

Hey all,

Just checking in with APP and seeing how everything is going. Still in the midst of school, so I haven't had time to actually use APP myself. But I still read the front page updates and I've been wondering why there's been a hiatus in the posting?

Curious about the research people got recruited for and how the APP training has been unfolding.

zacxpacx

aruffo
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Location: Evanston, IL

Postby aruffo » Tue Nov 04, 2014 3:27 pm

There's been a hiatus (of sorts) mainly because of the research I've been doing.

The results of the recruited experiment are in. There's a phenomenon that people find it easier to detect sounds that are going out-of-tune than going in-tune. Because this phenomenon is of course a relative-pitch phenomenon-- you can't detect the tuning of a perfect-fifth interval if you don't perceive the interval-- it seemed logical that, if absolute listeners are unable to hear intervals (but instead hear the two pitches and infer the interval), they wouldn't find it any more difficult to detect in-tune sounds than out-of-tune sounds.

Well, the results say that they do show the same effect. This result further undermines the assertion that absolute listeners either don't have or suppress their relative-pitch perceptions.

The second part of the experiment was to test minor thirds. I realized that the in-tune/out-of-tune phenomenon had only ever been tested on perfect fifths, and fifths and thirds are biologically different-- the fifth is wider than the critical bandwidth of the basilar membrane, and the third is narrower. So I ran the exact same experiment using minor thirds.

Non-musicians couldn't do it.

Musicians of all labeling skill could do it-- but the result was somewhat different. When they were comparing between the perfectly-tuned third and a neighboring interval, out-of-tune was easier than in-tune, just like the fifths. When they were comparing between a badly-tuned third and a still-more-badly-tuned third, it was actually reversed, so that going in-tune was easier.

Those are the results. The main reason I haven't finished writing it up yet is the same reason I've been delaying my further progress with APP-- namely, I've been plowing ahead with an experiment on acting performance that I need to be my "job talk" when looking for a Psych position. The other principal reason is that this result requires me to understand and explain the mathematical function that accounts for minor-thirds performance, and that's proving a bit tricky.

Still, the experiment is essentially done. If I were to take it further, it would be to test major seconds and/or tritones, to find out if the difference between them is due to the critical bandwidth or to the comparative dissonances of the intervals. I tried doing this myself, and the tritone gave me the same result as the fifth, but my hearing was not keen enough to hear the changes in the major seconds.

If anyone here feels up to the challenge of trying the major seconds, let me know, and I'll be happy to send you the experimental program-- although this being a test run, I would not be able to pay yez.

aruffo
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Joined: Tue Dec 14, 2004 12:09 pm
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Postby aruffo » Tue Nov 04, 2014 3:34 pm

Incidentally, as to what I'm looking at with the acting experiment, for those of you who're curious about that--

There's an excellent example of what I'm studying right here.

This is a play written by Ken Levine, who also wrote for "MASH" and "Cheers" and a whole bunch of other famous sitcoms. The show is being produced by Garry Marshall (creator of "Happy Days" and "The Odd Couple") and stars two professional union actors with substantial film, TV, and stage credits. The show has just opened for reviews after a full rehearsal schedule.

And yet if you look at the short scene they've chosen to promote the show, you will see that in the space of 20 seconds, the actors pause NINE TIMES, both between each others' lines and between their own sentences. (A "pause" in this case is a silence of more than 100 milliseconds.)

My experiment asks the question: what's with all the pausing?

zacxpacx
Posts: 157
Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2012 3:51 pm
Location: United States

Wary of Results

Postby zacxpacx » Sun Jan 04, 2015 3:31 pm

Hey Chris, regarding the experiment you conducted with identifying out of tune and in tune intervals, how big was the population/how were they selected for besides asking people on the forum if they wanted to volunteer?

I'm wary of the results because I suspect a small population.

zacxpacx
Posts: 157
Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2012 3:51 pm
Location: United States

Postby zacxpacx » Sun Jan 04, 2015 3:41 pm

Also to anyone who's played with Absolute Pitch Painter a lot, are there any obvious holes that need to be fixed? Not in terms of the program itself (bugs, glitches, etc.) but the theory behind what Absolute Pitch Painter is supposed to do -- develop categorical perception of chroma/pitch.

The problem with APA became apparent after awhile, wondering if there is any foreseeable issue with APP?

lorelei
Posts: 221
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 7:36 am

Postby lorelei » Sun Jan 04, 2015 3:48 pm

Chris, is the minor seconds test for RP or AP listeners? Or either?


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