tackling level 5

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aruffo
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tackling level 5

Postby aruffo » Fri Apr 18, 2014 5:11 pm

So now I'm nearly at the point where the octave is broken into the magic seven. In the Level 5 Large game, though, I'm not immediately setting my sights on winning. Rather, I'm just playing through, listening to chroma, and letting myself make mistakes, because I want to see how sharply defined my identification categories are. I'm only two games into the process so far, and this is what I'm seeing now:

Image

The division between the brown and grey, which had been a rather lame slant, is now a nice sharp drop, which surprises me (in a good way). The weakness in the upper part of the red/yellow doesn't surprise me, because I keep getting fooled by its less-obvious "plunky" quality and making a height judgment instead. The inconsistency in the green category is due almost entirely to keyboard errors (going too quickly seems to affect green the worst), but I'm quite pleased, though, to see the sharp drop from orange to green, which suggests to me that I may be getting better at recognizing that sour orange quality (as something other than height).

But this is only two games, so we'll see if those sharp drops become more dull as I proceed.!

abminor
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Postby abminor » Sat Apr 19, 2014 2:47 am

Nice.

I 'm suddenly wondering. How many final categories are there ? Seven or twelve ? I see already five plain color eggs on your graph so that would make me think seven unless you add different shades of the same color later.

I recall you wrote about a study that seems to prove absolute pitch possessors have in fact seven pitch categories corresponding to white keys instead of twelve and that they identify black keys relatively to the white keys.

aruffo
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Postby aruffo » Sat Apr 19, 2014 8:34 am

There are a total of twelve.. I wrote a bit about that on Feb 27. The study was Miyazaki's, where he tested reaction time.

aruffo
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Postby aruffo » Sat Apr 19, 2014 3:49 pm

Additionally-- in leveling up, I've started watching soundless Youtube videos while I go through the level-up game... it keeps me relaxed (and keeps me from getting bored!) while I do it, and I seem to listen better when I'm relaxed than when I'm trying hard.

EvilBlade
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Postby EvilBlade » Sat Apr 19, 2014 4:50 pm

aruffo wrote:Additionally-- in leveling up, I've started watching soundless Youtube videos while I go through the level-up game... it keeps me relaxed (and keeps me from getting bored!) while I do it, and I seem to listen better when I'm relaxed than when I'm trying hard.


I should definitely try it!! :D

aruffo
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Postby aruffo » Mon Apr 21, 2014 11:12 am

I've now played nine Large games (and restarted four times-- I've altered the scoring screen to now distinguish between games completed and games restarted). I have not skipped over the ambiguous tones, but allowed myself to make errors, so my results now look like this:

Image

Although there is some noise in the data due to keyboard errors, the results are easy to interpret because I know my subjective experience.

The steep drops between the lower four categories are legit, because those four categories all sound different to me. Even so, the fact that neither grey nor brown are at 100% is because, to me, they have different flavors of the same quality-- the quality is kind of a "tangy" quality, and the brown has a spicier version of it than the grey. If I take a moment to decide, I pick the right one, but if I'm going too quickly then it can be 50/50. I also still sometimes hear the brown quality, correctly recognize it, and then misattribute it to red/yellow. My best guess at why I do that is that the borderline red/yellow has a good measure of that "spicy" brown quality and I'm trying not to be fooled.

The curved slope at the top of the red/yellow category indicates the same problem I've been having-- that the quality I listen for in that category is less obvious as the sound approaches green, so I will often mistakenly pick green because of the absence of that "plunky" quality, rather than the presence of the green's "open" quality.

My terrible performance in the green category can no longer be blamed entirely on keyboard errors. The essential problem there is that my first judgment of green is often a height-based judgment. It isn't always, but it is often enough that I keep making mistakes. Instead of recognizing the green chroma, I'll first assess whether it's in the correct height area of the octave, and then, again, instead of listening for the green quality, I'll listen for the absence of either plunkiness (red/yellow) or tightness (orange)... and if I think I hear either of those qualities, even weakly, then I pick that non-green color, and I'm wrong.

But I've got to admit I'm getting better.. getting better all the time!

aruffo
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Postby aruffo » Wed Apr 23, 2014 12:11 pm

Finished with the Large games on level 5, after 17 complete games and 66 restarts (what can I say-- I get impatient).

The final pitch stats for Large looked like this.

Image

Obviously I know the lowest note of the red/yellow category the best (I think that's C). The border between it and brown looks closest to ideal categorical perception, plummeting from 100% to near-zero in just a few cents' difference.

The other areas still seem to accurately reflect my subjective experience so far.

The lack of accuracy evident in the brown and grey categories-- the fact that they're not 100%-- represent some uneasy footing at the start, when I'd confuse them for each other (they were part of the same category before, after all). I am still capable of confusing them for each other, but I have a clear sense of what brown sounds like and what grey sounds like. I'm a little concerned that part of my sense of grey is pegged to a melody, rather than to the actual sound of the tone, but here's hoping that that diminishes over time. Still, the steep slopes between grey–brown and grey–blue is encouraging.

The easier slopes between red/yellow and green, and between green and orange, are there for the same reason. The red/yellow-to-green slope is somewhat steeper because my sense of that "plunkiness" has started to creep upwards; the green/orange border is still weak for the same reason as before (making height judgments first), although when presented with a green egg at the center of its category, I recognize it from its quality rather than its height.

I'm still disinclined to say "chroma" as opposed to "quality" because I'm quite sure now that there are elements of scale degree and of piano timbre mixed in there.

As I proceeded through the Large game, I was surprised that I found myself guessing less and less. I don't necessarily mean that the ambiguous tones became any less ambiguous-- they're difficult to recognize by their very nature, and always will be-- but I am becoming more confident in my judgments, both when I know the tone and when I don't know the tone. As TS said:
instead of thinking that for each egg there are 3 possible categories, you must start to think that there is also a 4th possibility, "leave this for now"

The difference in confidence is that now, I am more frequently thinking "I can hear that this egg has qualities of both [category 1] and [category 2], so I'd better leave this for now, until I can compare it to a better exemplar of its category," as opposed to "I don't recognize that one.. could it be [category X] maybe?" A direct consequence of this difference is that it's much easier to keep myself from guessing, because the judgments I'm making are not guesses. I still get suckered quite frequently-- thus the steep drops and the fact that I restarted 66 times-- but that's the way it goes.

The judgments are still slow. I recognize this most clearly when I'm doing the level-up procedure, because I hear the tones and, because I'm listening for a change rather than for its quality, it doesn't even occur to me to categorize them. When I pay attention, it's possible to recognize categories, but it's not as easy as I imagine it should be, so obviously this learning is still very, very new to my brain, and still not an integral part of a sound.

The level-up stats are both encouraging and perplexing. When I look at them by category-- where what we want to see is worst performance at "center" and best performance at "cross-category"-- this is what I see:

Image

And this would seem to indicate that all but the lowest category are falling into line. But when I look at the full range, the results are a bit muddier, especially since the difference between descending and ascending changes is so pronounced:

Image
Image

When descending, center generally seems the worst and cross-category generally seems the best, and within-category kind of a wild card. But when ascending, center and cross both seem to be equally poor, with within-category judgments being better overall.

I really don't know what that means, as yet, so for the moment I'll just be pleased with the good look of the by-category view and press on to Jumbo... and then, in time, to Level 6.

aruffo
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Postby aruffo » Fri Apr 25, 2014 7:50 pm

Well, here are my final results for Level 5, as I now move into Level 6.

I got the highest score I've yet gotten for any Jumbo level-- 4,872.

Identification looks like this:

Image

which, of course, suggests stronger categorical perception for blue, grey, brown, and red/yellow (at the bottom), and weaker CP for orange, green, and red/yellow (at the top).

Discrimination, on the other hand, looks like this:

Image

which suggests stronger categories for grey, red/yellow, green, and orange, and weaker categories for blue and brown. The inverted-V shape is, again, attributable to different ascending/descending performance at the boundary crossings.

Time to see what happens in Level 6!


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