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A few Q's

Posted: Fri Nov 02, 2007 3:01 pm
by Ilusa
Are you supposed to know what type of chord each of the pictures represents in chordhopper or do you learn what each one is later on in the game.

I have the same q for apb are you supposed to know what each colour of enemy is from the start or are you told that later or is it that once you can seperate all the sounds it's easy to learn the names in a few mins?

Also I can't hear all three tones at once in each chord , well I'm not sure if I can if that makes any sense, how do you reccomend overcoming that so I can hear the chords more fully?
Any help would be great thanks

Posted: Fri Nov 02, 2007 5:27 pm
by aruffo
Chordhopper is completely learn-as-you go, and you'll discover once you're dealing with 2-3 chords that your mind will automatically start to hear the individual tones.

Posted: Sat Nov 03, 2007 7:29 am
by Ilusa
and are you supposed to know what each symbol/picutre stands for in each game or is that dealt with later?

Posted: Sat Nov 03, 2007 11:16 pm
by aruffo
I'm not sure exactly what you mean.. each picture represents each new chord as it's introduced; it doesn't go any deeper than that...

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2007 3:05 pm
by Ilusa
sorry I thought it was being clear i'll try agian. sorry

ok so I hear a note and I go oh yeah I hear a donout poicture or a mirror picture, does the game ever tell me that that dognut is in fact *insert type of chord it is here* during the game?

Does that make more sense I hope it does.

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2007 8:33 pm
by aruffo
Oh, no, it doesn't-- but once you've learned them you can call em anything you want.

Posted: Sat Nov 10, 2007 2:09 pm
by Andi
Perhaps this answer is more satisfying:
All the red symbols represent a C-Major-Chord, the orange symbols stand for F-Major and the blue ones for G-Major. They have different shapes which represent different inversions of the chord.
I think what Chris Aruffo means is that you don't have to give different names to the chords as long as you can distinguish them.
In my oppinion it is better to know the names of the chords because the more information you have about an item, the better it will be represented in your brain and therefore remembered. It might also be useful to know, that these chords are the I, IV and V chord of the C-Major scale and that many popular songs can be accompanied by just those three chords.

lg
Andi

Posted: Sun Jan 06, 2008 6:59 pm
by cjhealey
I think part of the reason Chris didn't label anything in the game is because he wants it to teach awareness.

The problem of labeling things is that EVERYONE has to use the same labels. So if the program used the chords for a Concert Pitch instrument and you are a trumpet player or a Sax player then all those labels would be wrong for you.

This way you develop the awareness and descrimination and you can choose what specific label you want to give each note/chord etc to suit your needs.

Does this make sense?

Chris :-)

Posted: Mon Jan 07, 2008 1:29 am
by petew83
cjhealey wrote:I think part of the reason Chris didn't label anything in the game is because he wants it to teach awareness.

The problem of labeling things is that EVERYONE has to use the same labels. So if the program used the chords for a Concert Pitch instrument and you are a trumpet player or a Sax player then all those labels would be wrong for you.

This way you develop the awareness and descrimination and you can choose what specific label you want to give each note/chord etc to suit your needs.

Does this make sense?

Chris :-)
I think Chris prefers images over verbal labels because they are more useful subconsciously. <1% of dreams have the written word.