1 word description for each interval sound

Comments and questions about Interval Loader.
petew83
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Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2005 6:55 pm

1 word description for each interval sound

Postby petew83 » Mon Aug 29, 2005 10:15 am

m2- biting
M2- thick
m3- melancholy
M3- happy
P4- oriental
T- weird
P5- powerful
m6- gloomy
M6- bright
m7- chunky
M7- painful
P8- clear

KosciaK
Posts: 227
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 8:45 am

Postby KosciaK » Mon Aug 29, 2005 10:47 am

Hello!

I think that these description depends on what music you are listening to and what your ears are used to.
For example I wouldn't say that P4 is oriental, rather powerfull and for me P5 would be consonant (maybe not as clear as octave). I would exchange descriptions of m2 and M7.
When I first started to play chords like X7 with alterations (lowered or raised fifth or ninth) it sounded for me so dissonant and weird. Now my ears get used to these sound and I think that these chords sounds very nice, tense but nice

Greetings!
KosciaK

aruffo
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Postby aruffo » Mon Aug 29, 2005 11:45 am

He raises an interesting point, though. I believe we all experience musical intervals in approximately the same way; if it weren't so, then it would be impossible to write "mood music".

I'd suggest that a musical interval communicates a specific and precise musical (emotional?) concept; although one might argue about the linguistic words you might use to describe each musical concept, my suspicion is that the musical concept itself is consistent.

KosciaK
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Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 8:45 am

Postby KosciaK » Mon Aug 29, 2005 12:52 pm

Hello!

Intervals are just mathematical proportions of the wave lenghts. Like with colors - Western people says that red is a color of danger, blood, anger while Eastern people would say it's a color of beauty, joy and love but this doesn't change the way we perceive the color - it's still red.

I bet that people that are used to classical music after listening to sophisticated jazz solo would say it was very dissonant and out of tune while jazz listener would say that soloist have created beautiful tension by playing slightly out and using some chord substitutions and alterations.

Tritone will buzz the same way in everyones ears but depending on what they are used to they will give different labels/descriptions. For some poeple this tritone will be awfully dissonant and for others it would be a nice tension or bluesy sound

Greetings!
KosciaK

Ehvam1
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Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2005 4:03 pm

Postby Ehvam1 » Mon Aug 29, 2005 2:17 pm

This might sound like a completely screwball theory, but i'll throw it out there anyway. I wonder if interval dissonace may effect brainwave states. Different brainwaves operate under different conditions.
Beta- fully awake, tense
alpha- relaxed awarenesss (meditaive)
theta- creative, visualization, dream states,
Delta- deep sleep.
Beta has the highest frequency "pulses" while delta has the lowest. Sound pulses or light pulses can make the brain match the pulses frequency- a process known as entrainment. So i've always wondered if the vibration inherant to intervals- the pulse you hear from tuning guitar strings to each other say, might entrain the brain to pulse at the same frequencey. So highly dissonant intervals wil pulse faster causing beta states, while less dissonant intervals, like fourths and fifths, might cause theta and delta. So highly disonant intervals will cause tension by pushing the brain into Beta, while less disonant ones will cause "rest" feelings by entraining the brain to delta waves.
It sounds crazy, but it makes a certain sense. If you've ever heard music with entrainment pulses built into them you'll know what i'm talking about. If the BPM of a song can do it, why not the subtle "pulse" of the intervals vibrations?

KosciaK
Posts: 227
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 8:45 am

Postby KosciaK » Mon Aug 29, 2005 2:30 pm

Hello!

Evham - Google for Brainwave Generator (BWGen) or Brainwave synchronisation.
It's not only the interval but also a pitch of the two waves that affects your brain behaviour. Both ears listen to separate waves and the brain after perceiving them makes this beating (pulsing) between them.
But these are very small intervals - it's probably less then minor second

Greetings!
KosciaK

Ehvam1
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Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2005 4:03 pm

Postby Ehvam1 » Mon Aug 29, 2005 3:41 pm

Hey KosciaK. Your right, for that particualar type of entrainment- binaural- the distances are very small. Basically, they are causeing an imaginbarey beat by using the stereo effect of small intervals. But BPM can have the same effect and they are much more pronounced. 40-60 beets per minute can cause delta to theta entrainment in brain, only usually not as powerful. Whereas, 80-120 tend to cause alpha and beta is caused by over 140 BPM. I think the effect might be subtle, but i wonder if its there. If BPM can cause entrainment, i wonder if ineetrvalic "pulses" may not do so to? Its a long shot, but i've never seen it addressed. What do you think?

Randy

paul-donnelly
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Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2005 7:27 pm

Postby paul-donnelly » Mon Aug 29, 2005 7:48 pm

I don't think that the intervals' effects are related to shifting your brain waves, becuase your brain waves don't change that fast, do they? Wouldn't you need to sustain the pitches for a while and give yourself time to adjust? I think it has more to do with the "complexity" of the interval, and what that means to the listener, in context. For example, a Gamelan orchestra tunes pairs of instruments slightly apart to create a shimmering sound. To some, that's a beautiful, engaging, sound, but it's just out of tune and grating to most people who are used to making everything perfectly tuned. In a rock tune I'd think a tritone was a strange and dissonant interval, but I wouldn't even remark on it in a jazz tune, since jazzers love to play seventh chords. In short, I think the intervals imply different things depending on the context and the listener's background. Much like the word "brood" means completely different things when you're talking about parents with a large family and when you talk about thinking about something obsessively.

Ehvam1
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Postby Ehvam1 » Mon Aug 29, 2005 9:38 pm

The time it takes for the brain to match incoming waves can be extremely quick. Specially if your going from a lower state to a higher. But for drops in freq. it usually takes longer. But it all depends. I'm sure as the brain tries to decode incoming information the brain wave states will change. But it all depends, like what your listening for. If your listening to understand a peice in a critical way, your brain will automatically go into hogher beta to work faster. If your listening in a relaxed way they wil probably react differentaly. I'm sure it doesn't play a big part, but considering how much information and electrical activity occurs in a mental second, i cant help but wonder what efect it has phisiologically. Not that nay of this is useful BTW, just something i've always been curious about. I remember reading that the parts of the brain that decodes musical information heavely rely on the "meaning" part of the brain. So it makes sense that different contexts will cause different sensations. Pleasure sometimes, dislike others. Its why i believe that relative pitch is much more musical than AP. The ultimate being a good sense of both obviously.

paul-donnelly
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Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2005 7:27 pm

Postby paul-donnelly » Mon Aug 29, 2005 11:06 pm

Ehvam1 wrote:Not that nay of this is useful BTW, just something i've always been curious about.

It is an interesting topic. I still hold the position that our responses to musical intervals are learned, although we may all hear the same sounds.

Ehvam1
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Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2005 4:03 pm

Postby Ehvam1 » Tue Aug 30, 2005 12:24 am

I actually agree with that wholeheartedly. I think what your experiencing at a time when you encounter a sound gets etched with the sound itself. Its like hearing an old song and suddenly feeling the same way you did when you first heard it. I love it when that happens. Mind you, thats a whole song, but i'm sure it happens with inetervals too.

cooper
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Postby cooper » Mon Nov 07, 2005 8:24 pm

I would describe the P4 as a suspended feeling which musically all suspended chords are P4's.

The m7 to me begs resolution.

I've yet to figure out the symbols to help me identify a certain interval. Some make sense but some don't. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

aruffo
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Postby aruffo » Mon Nov 07, 2005 8:40 pm

Do you mean "figure out' in terms of relating the little icon to the sound?

There's no deliberate relationship; the icon is just a way to identify the sound without using a word or letter name.

Leo
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Postby Leo » Fri Apr 07, 2006 1:52 pm

A possible way to make the descripter useful to everyone is to make the words user definable.

Have a default word for each as already suggested, then allow a person to go in and type thier own word in. simular to how the keyboard letters are user definable.

m2- biting could become EDGY
M2- thick becomes FOGGY

OR A PERSON COULD PUT THE ACTUAL DEGREE IN.

m3- melancholy becomes III degree

OR THE ACTUAL CHORD NAME

M3- happy becomes MAJOR 3RD

I do however think it important to make this a on/off feature.

henry
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed May 24, 2006 10:57 am

Postby henry » Tue Nov 14, 2006 11:35 pm

good topic, Ive often thought of this while playing IL the ones that particularly come to mind are
m6 - forlorn , the interval makes me think of a rainy day like the umbrella
P5 - divine
P4 - monastic (maybe because of my associations with gregorian chant)
M3 - poised, like something is about to happen


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