Function and desirable musical structure of intervals etc

Comments and questions about Interval Loader.
Axeman
Posts: 151
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2005 4:20 pm
Location: New Zealand

Function and desirable musical structure of intervals etc

Postby Axeman » Thu Dec 11, 2008 2:48 am

This would mean that when you're training your musical ear, you don't want to learn and memorize prototypes. You don't want to train yourself to recognize new sounds only by comparing them to an ideal sample you have stuck in your head. It isn't a matter of mere efficiency; rather, it's the difference between learning the functional, meaningful, and desirable musical structure of major third versus the useless, unimportant, and isolated non-musical group of "sounds which resemble this other one I can remember."

I remember reading a short bit about ear training in a book while in our main city library many years ago about the functionality of intervals and chords etc. Sorry I can't remember the author or title. It was saying that conventional ear training takes uterly the wrong approach in singling out intervals by learning to compare them against other intervals. Instead, it talked about the musical effect(perhaps emotional) of say going down a perfect fifth at a particular junction in the music.
I myself spent alot of time doing the David Burge relative pitch course which taught in this way. While doing the exercises I got very good at naming intervals and singing them and eventually at naming chords too. However the skill was less than what he promoted it as and the effort involved was mamoth. I can hear certain sounds in live music but the intervals and chords go by so fast that the RP his course gave me isn;t usually up to the task of hearing all that is going on. It leads me to wonder also about interval loader and the way it also teaches intervals in isolation from their function. This is one of the reasons why I don't play it any more.
Perhaps a better game would be to isolate the funtion of an interval and have the player identify it in a short segment of melody or a chord progression. This is a more real-life situation. What I want ot develop as far as ear training goes is to be able to hear a chord progression and say oh that's a I, vi, ii, V7, I progression. Or those guys are singing in 3rds or 5ths etc. WIth AP I could also tell the key. Not much of what I have learnt so far in EAR training of any system has got me even close to what I imagine is posibble to hear. I'm sure my ear has improved over the years and that I have normal hearing. So maybe the systems of traning are at fault.

Axeman
Posts: 151
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2005 4:20 pm
Location: New Zealand

correction to last post

Postby Axeman » Thu Dec 11, 2008 2:52 am

The Burge Course also taught RP intervals in isolation as per traditional models too.

abminor
Posts: 87
Joined: Wed May 23, 2007 7:55 am

Postby abminor » Thu Dec 11, 2008 4:13 am

I believe there is no better ear training than picking up live music with your instrument (and without but its usually slower) and eventually write it down. Sight singing helps too. As opposed to the ear training systems you mentioned this are real music applications. Moreover, practising thoses is never a waste of time because you learn song you like by ear and learn some musical vocabulary.

I know there is nothing revolutionary in what I say but sometimes it's good to be remembered the basics (that I forgot myself regulary). The thing with all those software helps is that it can get you pretty far of real music and before you can realize you have spent on it a lot of time forgeting your original goal which is after all to become a better musician. It not wihout reason that all the best players recommand the above method as a mean to improve musically.

If you really want to use a software I recommend you use audiation assistant which makes you sing by imitation tonal patterns (which happens to be arpeggios chained in various progressions and played with several inversions). After a while you start remembering the patterns like they were words of a language. Once you know a sufficient number of words, you become able to know the individual letters (solfege syllable) and find out automatically new words and phrases by ear.

Axeman
Posts: 151
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2005 4:20 pm
Location: New Zealand

Postby Axeman » Fri Dec 12, 2008 3:28 pm

yeah that sounds good abminor. I have always done that kind of thing but only in short bursts. One of my favourite solos that I learnt off a tape recording is of a blues tune by Larry Carlton. It was pretty cool actually because it taught me some theory applications as well. E.g. in the solo the there is a part where the chord is C7 and it was in the 10th bar of the blues in G, he uses arpeggios of C and Bb in successions of triplets over the chord making in effect a C11 chord sound which is really cool.
I have read lots of biographies of famous jazz players like Charlie Parker and others using transcribing (at least by ear in parker's case) exclusively in learning to play.
I am having to learn lots of tunes now by ear or off the record so I am hoping that my ear will improve in the coming months.


Return to “Interval Loader”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests